A White professor declares she has been hiding her Black identity for her entire professional career


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What an intimate shock for everyone when it was revealed that Jessica A. Krug, for her entire career life, has portrayed herself as a black person. Jessica is an affiliated professor at George Washington College who has written about Africa, Latin America, the diaspora, and identification. She presented herself from Black and Latina heritage.

The Thursday article released on Medium.com revealed the true identity of Jessica A. Krug, being a White and Jewish native. She wrote that she experienced her life living as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City.

Another main point by Jessica

Another point was cleared on the post made by Jessica that she had no right to claim these identities of Black and Latin heritage. Jessica being a White woman has made unjustness to the Black community and has demoralized the identities and cultures of the Black.

Jessica apologized for the appropriation of Black Caribbean identity and accepted that she was unethical, anti-Black, immoral, and colonial. She is very epitome of violence, of thievery, and appropriation that non-Black people continue to use for abusing the Black people.

A student is shocked by the revelation 

It was a piece of quite shocking news for a junior student studying international affairs at George Washington named Anmol Goraya. The former student, Anmol had Jessica as her introductory history class professor in the spring session of 2019. 

At that time, the student said that Jessica used to dress up in the leopard print with huge hoop earrings & classic heels for the class. Krug has always been Anmol’s one of the favorite professors because of her energetic and colorful style to live. Anmol said that she was always curious to know more and more about her.

Goraya also talked about Jessica

Goraya exclaimed that Jessica often marked the Blacks and sometimes shared the struggles of Black champions and indigenous artists. She also lectured on topics like the role of rice in the African diaspora and the Indigenous populations in Chile. Goraya was really inspired by the professor, but it all turns out to be a great lie.

Jessica told the class that she was proud to be a Bronx native. Her speech included lots of Spanish wordings as she would rather prefer to say “plátanos” than the “plantains.” It was always quite uncertain from where she actually belonged. One student told me that her family lived in the Dominican Republic, while another student told me that she was from Puerto Rico.

Krug would also say the N-word when it was in texts the class was reading, Goraya told CNN.

The university is investigating

Crystal Nosal, a spokesperson on behalf of George Washington University told CNN that the university is looking into circumstances that have formed up after Jessica’s posting. Moreover, the university cannot further discuss their staff’s personal information. CNN also tried to reach out to Jessica herself, but they didn’t have an immediate response.  

Jessica’s case took us back to a glimpse in 2015 where Rachel Dozel who taught Africana studies at Eastern Washington University and headed her local chapter of the NAACP. She is another White woman who passed her career as a Black woman.

Headline on twitter

It became headline news on twitter as people started talking about that White woman like Jessica taking away job opportunities from the black. Everyone on twitter is protesting that non-black people are doing unjustness to the Black community.

Organizer Leslie Mac wrote in her article that she can’t undo the harm at any cost, which was caused to the black community. Jessica kept hiding her identity and she was even rewarded for her efforts.  Leslie complained that her sole objective was to get attention and access by pretending as a Black Woman.

She referred to her ancestors in one piece 

According to her staff page on George Washington University’s website, it is clearly mentioned that Jessica A. Krug in 2012 received her Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Jessica as a History Professor

Jessica is a history professor who takes a deep interest in ideas, cultural practices, and politics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Her main interest resides in Black transnational cultural studies and West Central Africa and maroon societies in the early modern period.

Jessica in her book Fugitive Modernities: Politics and Identity outside the State in Kisama, Angola, and the Americas, interrogated the political practices and discussions upon slavery and the violence of the slave trade in Angola. She began the book by referencing it to those who came before her, her grandparents, and her ancestors. The book is now placed as evidence that Jessica has always lied about her identity.

Jessica searched the communities of Brazil and Colombia for the use of seventeenth-century maroon (fugitive) and later ended the book by explaining the relationship between resistance, non-state politics, and colonial and post-colonial politics.

Book of Jessica named Fathers of No Nation

Another book of Jessica named Fathers of No Nation compares the relationship from the sixteenth century through the present about resistance leaders and the gendered politics of authority in the states of São Tomé, the Dominican Republic, and Jamaica.

Most recently on August 27, she wrote Essence’s Magazine named that article with “On Puerto Rico, Blackness, and Being When Nations Aren’t Enough.” The piece has been removed from the Essence’s site since she revealed her identity.

Her areas of expertise include Africa, Latin America, African American History, Early Modern World, Imperialism, and Colonialism. Prof. Krug has also written on hip hop, politics, and gender in both Angola and New York City. She is deeply interested in studying intellectual histories who never wrote about the use of embodied knowledge for both research and teaching.

Classes taught:

  • HIST 1011: World History, 1500-Present
  • HIST 3501: Topics in African History
  • HIST 3510: African History to 1880
  • HIST 3520: Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World
  • The Caribbean on the Move: The Politics of Immigration and Popular Dance in the Caribbean and Its Diasporas
  • Africa and the African Diaspora: (Trans)Nationalism and the Politics of Modernity


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